Saturday 26 January 2008 à 17:36

Awarding certificates

Sophie Mouge. Correspondent aboard the Aurora Australis

This morning, many of us wake to the sound of a thundering announcement: “Good morning to all expeditioneers! As you know, today is Australia Day. You are invited to the traditional Devonshire Tea in the mess at 10:00!”

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Saturday 26 January 2008 à 17:31

Data for the Aurora Australis

Sophie Mouge. Correspondent aboard the Aurora Australis

Position of the icebreaker:
- latitude: 44°01.034’ S
- longitude: 147°25.720’ E
Wind:
- direction: N-NE
- speed: 16 knots
Water temperature: 16.3 °C
Air temperature: 16.1 °C
Atmospheric pressure: 1,010 HPa
Relative humidity: 85 %
UV B: 7 W/m²
Water depth: 3,225 meters
Sunset: 20h46 / sunrise: 06h00

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Saturday 26 January 2008 à 12:17

Position of Aurora Australis

Sophie Mouge. Correspondent aboard the Aurora Australis

FROM: Martin Riddle
DATE: 26/01/08
REPORT (SITREP) NO.: 340
UNIVERSAL TIME: 0100
LOCAL (SHIP) TIME: 1200
AUSTRALIAN EASTERN STANDARD TIME: 1200
POSITION: -47 57.5, 145 47.6
HEADING: 357T
CURRENT SPEED (KNOTS): 12.0 kts
DISTANCE TO NEXT WAYPOINT (NAUTICAL MILES): 187 to PULSE mooring
DISTANCE COVERED LAST 24 HOURS (NAUTICAL MILES): 289.5
WEATHER CONDITIONS: Overcast with low cloud, 7/8th cover, good visibility, winds 23 kts from 330T gusting to 25 kts
AIR TEMPERATURE: 11.5
SEA TEMPERATURE: 11
SEA CONDITIONS: Vessel rolling slightly in moderate seas and NW'ly swell 20-3m
ICE CONDITIONS: Nil
REMARKS: The swell has moderated significantly since yesterday and everyone is much more comfortable as the ship gently rolls its way home via the PULSE mooring at about 45S. People still busy packing, processing data and preparing results. The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in the ocean and atmosphere will continue to be measured until we reach Tasmania. The region of greatest CO2 concentration in the surface waters was measured at the SubAntarctic front (-53.8 S), where oceanic pCO2 was up to 25% above atmospheric levels. The SubAntarctic zone is a region of uptake for atmospheric CO2 throughout the year, with the highest uptake over summer due to shallower mixed layers and increased biological production. It is now well known that even slight acidification of the ocean caused by rising atmospheric CO2 levels will make it hard for some animals to build or maintain calcium carbonate shells. The combination of benthic biologists and chemists on the voyage has provided an excellent opportunity for exploring the likely impact of ocean acidification on the sea-bed living animals around Antarctica.
Regards, Martin and Sarah.

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