Friday 4 January 2008 à 18:03

En route to Dumont d’Urville

Anne Goffart. Correspondent aboard the Astrolabe

A strong sea and high winds of as much as 50 knots last night (about 92 km/h) are making it difficult to cross to Dumont d'Urville in Adelie Land.

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Friday 4 January 2008 à 16:04

Position of Astrolabe at 06:33 UTC

Anne Goffart. Correspondent aboard the Astrolabe

61° 09 S
142° 03 E

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Friday 4 January 2008 à 13:11

Antarctic biodiversity inventory: for what?

Sophie Mouge. Correspondent aboard the Aurora Australis

The return of good weather means we can enjoy a fabulous sunset on the horizon of Antarctic sea early this morning, around one o’clock. Once again, our star never left us. It stayed essentially at the same height for three hours.

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Friday 4 January 2008 à 13:01

Data for the Aurora Australis at 12h30

Sophie Mouge. Correspondent aboard the Aurora Australis

Position of the icebreaker:
- latitude: 66°19.089' S
- longitude: 143°37.275’ E
Wind:
- direction: SE
- speed: 30 knots
Water temperature: -0.6°C
Air temperature: -4°C and -25°C in the wind
Atmospheric pressure: 972 hPa
Relative humidity: 80%
UV-B: 4 W/m²
Water depth: 580 meters
Sunrise: above the horizon all day

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Friday 4 January 2008 à 13:00

Position of Aurora Australis

Sophie Mouge. Correspondent aboard the Aurora Australis

FROM: Martin Riddle
DATE: 04/01/08
REPORT (SITREP) NO.: 319
UNIVERSAL TIME: 0100
LOCAL (SHIP) TIME: 1200
AUSTRALIAN EASTERN STANDARD TIME: 1200
POSITION: -66 19S, 143 59E
HEADING: 140T
CURRENT SPEED (KNOTS): 2.5
DISTANCE TO NEXT WAYPOINT (NAUTICAL MILES): N/A
DISTANCE COVERED LAST 24 HOURS (NAUTICAL MILES): 94.6
WEATHER CONDITIONS: Overcast, low grey clouds, visibility good, wind 34 kts from 149T with gusts to 36 kts
AIR TEMPERATURE: -4
SEA TEMPERATURE: -0.6
SEA CONDITIONS: Moderate to rough seas and moderate SE'ly swell 2-3 m ICE
CONDITIONS: Isolated bergs, open water.
REMARKS: Yesterday's blue skies and calm seas were a great contrast to the stormy weather that began the New Year. We took advantage of the opportunity and completed 6 stations in the last 2 shift, with the night shift putting in a particularly strong effort to do nearly 4 complete stations. This afternoon the strong winds are returning as predicted and may force another halt to sampling in the next few hours. We are approaching the end of this stage of the CEAMARC sampling and when conditions allow we will return to the Polynya moorings to move the Pole Compass. The big isopods, amphipods and sea-spiders of the past few days were put firmly in their place last night by the arrival of the Big Polychaete. This magnificent bristle-worm (a polynoid or scale-worm) was about 9 inches (230 mm) long, 3.5 inches (90 mm) across, with scales more than 1 inch (24 mm) in diameter and weighed about 330 gm - at just three to the kilo this is by far the largest polychaete seen by any of the benthic ecologists on board. We have since captured video imagery of these monsters scurrying along the sea-bed as the trawl approaches. To top it off, the bristle-worms arrived complete with their own over-size parasitic nematodes (up to 4 inches long) infesting the space under the scales.
Regards, Martin and Sarah.

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